Comportement des structures métalliques fabriquées par le biais un procédé additif contre les menaces de type explosif

par Magda Stanczak

Projet de thèse en Science des Matériaux

Sous la direction de Marion Martiny, Teresa Fras et de Alexis Rusinek.

Thèses en préparation à l'Université de Lorraine , dans le cadre de C2MP - CHIMIE MECANIQUE MATERIAUX PHYSIQUE , en partenariat avec LEM3 - Laboratoire d Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (laboratoire) depuis le 12-11-2018 .


  • Résumé

    Additive-manufacturing (AM) methods allow highly complex structures with complicated geometries and accurate physical properties to be obtained, which fullfils modern direction of structures development. Nowaday, the importance of smart materials and structures for energy-absorption in extreme events is growing more and more. Moreover, the design of structures both light in weight and able to mitigate both blast and localised impacts is a complex challenge. The AM provides the flexibility to create complex part geometries that are difficult to build using traditional manufacturing. Control over material and geometrical properties is used to build elements with internal cavities and lattice structures that help reduce parts' weight without compromising their mechanical performance. Additive production already is being used in many industrial applications e.g. for certain Boeing parts, as well as various ducts within the forward fuselage of the F/A-18 Hornet fighter aircraft. A design-driven manufacturing process might be applicable on the battle field for ‘on-site' components production, forming parts or elements which were damaged due to fatigue or ballistic firing – generally, the techniques could be useful in all cases where managing with the obsolescence of components for combat equipment is required. The thesis is focused on evaluation of protective properties of structures obtained due to the selective laser metal melting technique applied for blast protection systems. Sandwich panels composed of cellular/trusses structures and metal facets will be tested for blast resistance applications. The essential parts of the proposed research will be related to modeling of 3D structures compaction under high dynamic load, design and manufacturing of academic sample structures and experimental observation of compaction behavior of the structures submitted to blast loads. The performance of these hybrid composite structures under impulsive loading will be numerically modeled to complete the study. The aim of the thesis is to propose the experimentally-numerical methodology leading to manufacturing metallic components with pre-designed internal structures efficiently applied to absorb the energy of blast waves.

  • Titre traduit

    Behaviour of additively manufactured metallic structures under blast loading


  • Résumé

    Additive-manufacturing (AM) methods allow highly complex structures with complicated geometries and accurate physical properties to be obtained, which fulfills modern direction of structures development. Nowadays, the importance of smart materials and structures for energy-absorption in extreme events is growing. Moreover, the design of structures both light in weight and able to mitigate both blast and localized impacts is a complex challenge. The AM provides the flexibility to create complex part geometries that are difficult to build using traditional manufacturing. Control over material and geometrical properties is used to build elements with internal cavities and lattice structures that help reduce parts' weight without compromising their mechanical performance. Additive production already is being used in many industrial applications e.g. for certain Boeing parts, as well as various ducts within the forward fuselage of the F/A-18 Hornet fighter aircraft. A design-driven manufacturing process might be applicable on the battle field for ‘on-site' components production, forming parts or elements which were damaged due to fatigue or ballistic firing – generally, the techniques could be useful in all cases where managing with the obsolescence of components for combat equipment is required. The thesis is focused on evaluation of protective properties of structures obtained due to the selective laser metal melting technique applied for blast protection systems. Sandwich panels composed of cellular/trusses structures and metal facets will be tested for blast resistance applications. The essential parts of the proposed research will be related to modeling of 3D structures compaction under high dynamic load, design and manufacturing of academic sample structures and experimental observation of compaction behavior of the structures submitted to blast loads. The performance of these hybrid composite structures under impulsive loading will be numerically modeled to complete the study. The aim of the thesis is to propose the experimentally-numerical methodology leading to manufacturing metallic components with pre-designed internal structures efficiently applied to absorb the energy of blast waves.