Développement d'une approche de bio impression 3D intégrative, in situ et in vivo, pour la régénération osseuse

par Nicolas Touya

Projet de thèse en Biologie Cellulaire et Physiopathologie

Sous la direction de Raphaël Devillard.

Thèses en préparation à Bordeaux , dans le cadre de École doctorale Sciences de la vie et de la santé , en partenariat avec Bioingénierie tissulaire (laboratoire) et de l'Ingénierie tissulaire assistée par laser (equipe de recherche) depuis le 12-11-2019 .


  • Résumé

    Musculoskeletal disorders, including those resulting from trauma or following bone cancer resection, directly affect the mobility, autonomy and quality of life of more than 100 million Europeans. Orthopedic and oral surgery is expected to witness the highest growth in the coming years. The current clinical gold standard relies on the use of autologous bone grafts. However, the supply of suitable bone is often limited and this procedure has significant inherent risks, including infectionand potential loss of function at the donor site. Clinicians can overcome this barrier by using synthetic or natural scaffolds, combined with autologous cells, in order to regenerate bone. Nonetheless, this classical tissue engineering approach hardly mimics the intricate microstructural features of native tissues and has shown limited clinical success. In this context, new approaches are strongly awaited.Bioprinting is defined by the simultaneous deposition of structural biomaterials and living cells. This emergent technology is a novel tissue engineering approach able to recreate the microenvironmentof cellsand to promote the interplay between cells, matrix and local native tissue. In the field of in vivodirect bioprinting we were pioneers, and published the first report of bone repair using laser-assisted bioprinting. The only other two in vivobioprinting reports have investigated the bioprinting of keratinocytes and fibroblasts or amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into a mouse skin defect, using respectively inkjet or microextrusion bioprinting technologies.Themain objectives of this thesis are 1) to demonstrate the proof of principle for the 3D bioprinting of clinically relevant bone cells and biomaterials to support bone repair, and 2) to develop a multimodal printing platform combining several bioprinting technologies, designed to be later associated to robotic surgical tools for regenerative medicine.Themain goalsof the thesisare to:-establish the optimal bioink formulation, in order sustain the survival, proliferation and differentiation of both ECs and MSCs. -Adapt a newly commercialized bioprinter forin situ bioprinting.-Defineoptimal LAB printing conditions and procedures for in situbioprinting with high reproducibility.-Designoptimal patterns for bone regeneration.

  • Titre traduit

    Developping an in situ and in vivo 3D Bioprinting integrative approach for bone regeneration


  • Résumé

    Musculoskeletal disorders, including those resulting from trauma or following bone cancer resection, directly affect the mobility, autonomy and quality of life of more than 100 million Europeans. Orthopedic and oral surgery is expected to witness the highest growth in the coming years. The current clinical gold standard relies on the use of autologous bone grafts. However, the supply of suitable bone is often limited and this procedure has significant inherent risks, including infectionand potential loss of function at the donor site. Clinicians can overcome this barrier by using synthetic or natural scaffolds, combined with autologous cells, in order to regenerate bone. Nonetheless, this classical tissue engineering approach hardly mimics the intricate microstructural features of native tissues and has shown limited clinical success. In this context, new approaches are strongly awaited.Bioprinting is defined by the simultaneous deposition of structural biomaterials and living cells. This emergent technology is a novel tissue engineering approach able to recreate the microenvironmentof cellsand to promote the interplay between cells, matrix and local native tissue. In the field of in vivodirect bioprinting we were pioneers, and published the first report of bone repair using laser-assisted bioprinting. The only other two in vivobioprinting reports have investigated the bioprinting of keratinocytes and fibroblasts or amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into a mouse skin defect, using respectively inkjet or microextrusion bioprinting technologies.Themain objectives of this thesis are 1) to demonstrate the proof of principle for the 3D bioprinting of clinically relevant bone cells and biomaterials to support bone repair, and 2) to develop a multimodal printing platform combining several bioprinting technologies, designed to be later associated to robotic surgical tools for regenerative medicine.Themain goalsof the thesisare to:-establish the optimal bioink formulation, in order sustain the survival, proliferation and differentiation of both ECs and MSCs. -Adapt a newly commercialized bioprinter forin situ bioprinting.-Defineoptimal LAB printing conditions and procedures for in situbioprinting with high reproducibility.-Designoptimal patterns for bone regeneration.